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27Nov

Norway Just Mandated Zero-Emission Fjords to Lead Electric Boat Charge

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“For the first time in the world there is a requirement for emission-free sailing in the fjords and the ports,” says leader of the environmental foundation ZERO, Marius Holm. “Norway has long been a world leader of emission-free ferries, driven by good political decisions on zero-emission requirements. Now we take a new step within the maritime green shift that has global reverberations. Nationally, this will provide valuable development of emission-free solutions to many tourist ships, we cut out major greenhouse gas emissions, and we prevent harmful local air pollution.”

27Nov

Oslo Harbour cleans up it's waters by drafting in portable remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) which detect rubbish hotspots

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The Oslo Port Authority purchased a small, portable Deeptrekker mini-ROV which gives the harbour authority a fish-eye view of the underwater ‘islands of trash’.

25Nov

Ship Fined in Marseilles: Cruise pollution case

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The master of the US cruise ship Azura, owned by Carnival, charged with breaking air pollution laws in the French port of Marseille has been fined 100,000 euros.

23Nov

EU should move faster on Asian approvals to deliver meaningful scrapping regulations

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From 31 December 2018, large commercial seagoing vessels flying the flag of an EU Member State may be recycled only in safe and sound ship recycling facilities included in the European List of ship recycling facilities, in order to comply with the EU Ship Recycling Regulation (SRR). The List was first established on 19 December 2016 and updated in May 2018. As of May 2018, the list included 21 shipyards all located in the EU, only show a capacity of scrapping facilities of just 300,000 LDT*, which the shipping industry considers to be insufficient based on demand estimates.

31Oct

Did you know?

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Plastic pollution in the ocean frequently appears as seabird guts filled with cigarette lighters and bottle caps, marine mammals entangled in fishing gear and drifting plastic bags mimicking a gelatinous meal. Last year, a study estimated that around eight million metric tons of our plastic waste enter the oceans from land each year.